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5 things to know about a clawfoot tub

Bathrooms come in all shapes and sizes, and over time, the fixtures for these special rooms have changed quite a bit. One fixture that has remained attractive over the years is a clawfoot tub. Many older homes in Boston have a clawfoot tub, but you can also find these unique fixtures in brand new construction.

The plumbing for a clawfoot tub is a little different than today’s standard tub. So, if you’re considering adding one, or you have one already installed in your home and need to repair or replace it, here are a few facts you should know about the plumbing for a clawfoot tub.

Source and drain lines come through the floor. In a typical clawfoot tub installation, both the water source pipes and the drain pipe enter the bathroom through the floor. For a new installation, you’ll need to have enough space at the drain end of the tub to make these floor connections, and you’ll need to plan for plumbing underneath the tub. Consult with a licensed plumber if you intend to install a clawfoot tub on the second floor of your home! Insulate the pipes well during the installation process, if your supply and drain pipes will run through an unheated (or under-heated) space in your home.

Consider your water heater! Clawfoot tubs can hold anywhere between 40-60 gallons of water. That means one good soak could completely drain your 40-gallon water heater. That may not be a consideration for you, but the rest of your busy household might be inconvenienced when someone is using the tub. (Or worse, you could end up with a cold bath if your tub is competing with the dishwasher and the washing machine!) Make sure your water heater can support the tub in addition to other hot water fixtures in your home. If not, consider an upgrade to your water heater when you install a clawfoot tub.

Tubs are heavy! Bathtubs of all kinds are heavy. A clawfoot tub can be made from acrylic, but a classic clawfoot tub is made of cast iron with a porcelain finish. An empty cast iron tub can weigh between 200 and 400 pounds. Add water and the weight on the floor will increase to between 500 and 900 pounds. And that doesn’t include the bather! Before you install a clawfoot tub, make certain that your floor is in very good shape, and can tolerate a regular load of about 1,000 pounds. If you’re not certain, you may need to have the bathroom floor reinforced before installing the tub.

More than meets the eye. A clawfoot tub is essentially a stand-alone fixture, so the plumbing for the tub will be exposed for all to see. While some people consider this a disadvantage, you can find special fixtures with decorative finishes that greatly improve the visual appeal of the tub. The inner material for clawfoot plumbing is made from the same materials that standard plumbing fixtures are, but clawfoot plumbing fixtures typically have decorative finishes of brushed nickel, chrome or polished brass. Although not technically a “fixture,” the feet on each tub are unique. If you have one foot that needs to be replaced, a new one can be created by making a mold from one of the remaining feet, or you can have four new feet created.

Install shut-off valves on your supply lines. Like any other plumbing fixture in your home, you want supply line shut-off valves on your clawfoot tub. Make sure the stops are easily accessible!

If you’re considering the addition of a clawfoot tub, but would like help with the process, contact us at Boston Standard Plumbing & Heating at (617) 288-2911 for a quote on installation. We can help you determine if your bathroom will accommodate a clawfoot tub, and we can also help with the sizing, plumbing and installation of this unique bathroom fixture.

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3 Plumbing Repairs You Can Complete On Your Own

Not every residential plumbing problem requires the assistance of a master plumber. Here are three repairs you can complete on your own, and here are a few tips to help you determine when it’s best to call for some professional assistance.

Leaking faucets:

Leaking faucets are prime DIY candidates. Faucets can leak for a variety of reasons, and most often, the repair requires only common hand tools, the replacement part, some Teflon tape and less than an hour of time. Faucets can leak because the seals, O-rings or washers have gone bad. Your faucet might also develop leaks if a ceramic disk inside the fixture has cracked or broken. Diagnosing the cause of the leak requires you to turn off the water to the fixture, disassemble the fixture and replace the defective part. Reassemble the fixture and ensure that your connections are tight.

When to ask for help:
Consider calling for help if your leaking fixture doesn’t have separate shut-off valves on the water lines that feed the fixture, or if the shut-off valve is stuck or broken. Also consider calling a plumbing repair service if the feed lines are hidden in the wall, or soldered to the fixture.

Running toilets:

Water can “leak” into the bowl if the valve at the bottom of your toilet tank doesn’t seal properly, or if the tank is adjusted to overfill after a flush. Water can also leak from a tank that is cracked. The flapper valve at the bottom of the tank is usually just a large piece of rubber that covers the drain hole at the bottom of the tank. Over time, the valve deteriorates and allows water to leak from the tank to the bowl, causing the bowl to periodically discharge the extra water.
If your tank simply overfills after a flush, adjust the float to shut off the water sooner. It’s usually just a screw-type adjustment, so there are no parts needed here. If the tank leaks water because it’s cracked or broken, the only fix for this is to get a new tank.

Replacing the flapper valve involves a quick trip to the hardware store to get a new valve. If you’re feeling adventurous or you don’t have a lot of confidence in the remaining parts of your toilet tank, you can buy an entire kit and replace everything inside the tank at once. Again, just a few hand tools are all that’s needed, and your toilet will be in business again.

When to ask for help: Consider calling for help if your toilet doesn’t have a separate shut-off valve on the water line that feeds it, or if the shut-off valve is stuck or broken. Also consider calling a pro if the toilet bowl needs to be replaced, or wastewater is leaking out onto the floor from underneath the toilet.

Clogged drains:

Every homeowner should invest in a drain snake, and an enzymatic drain cleaner, like Bio-Clean. Clogs are usually made of organic materials like hair and food particles that combine with soap residue. Biological organisms can also grow in drains and eventually shut them down altogether. A drain snake is a long piece of loosely coiled metal that can be used to catch a clog and withdraw it from the drain. To clear out a drain, you’ll need to open the trap and drain the pipe to the best of your ability. Introduce the snake into the drain until you encounter the clog. Once you’ve got the clog trapped in the snake, pull the snake back out and your drain should be clear.

Snaking a drain isn’t anyone’s favorite job, so be prepared for a lot of muck, a nasty-looking clog and some unpleasant odors. When the clog has been removed, reassemble the drain and check for leaks. To prevent clogs or to break up a clog without tearing the drain apart, try an enzymatic drain cleaner like BioClean. The enzymes in BioClean will literally eat their way through the clog and open up a slow drain overnight. There is no potential risk to you or your pipes when you use BioClean because it contains no harsh chemicals – just natural enzymes that will gladly gobble up a nasty clog.

When to ask for help: Sometimes a drainpipe clogs because it has calcified and just needs to be replaced. This can be a “worst-case” scenario for homeowners. If you have a drain that repeatedly clogs or always runs slowly, and snaking the drain hasn’t improved its performance, contact a drain cleaning and repair service for an evaluation.

You can always count on Boston Standard Plumbing for assistance with all of your plumbing, heating and cooling needs. Call us anytime at (617) 288-2911 to schedule an appointment, or to help out with a plumbing repair, heating repair or emergency AC repair. We’re available 24 hours a day, and a licensed plumber always answers your after-hours calls.

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Flushable Wipes? Not So Fast!

A recent story in USA Today brings to light a growing problem: “flushable” wipes are creating clogged sewers. Some manufacturers have brought to market a disposable wipe that they claim is flushable. The problem is that the wipes don’t break down in the sewer system like toilet paper does, and cities are working to cope with an increase in material accumulations in their sewer systems.

Manufacturers of the wipes say that their products do indeed break down, but Consumer Reports disagrees. According to CR, ordinary toilet paper doesn’t last more than a few seconds in water before it begins to disintegrate. Flushable wipes, on the other hand, don’t show any serious breakdowns even after 30 minutes in the sewer system.

Flushable wipe manufacturers are quick to point the finger at other products, like baby wipes, tampons, condoms and diapers, which some consumers will dispose of in the toilet. Unfortunately, these products are a lot less like toilet paper and much more like fabric, so they end up clogging up the works at the pumping stations and in the waste treatment facilities largely in the same condition they were in when they were flushed. These items can hang around indefinitely in septic systems, too.

While some consumers may find the idea of flushing wipes to be convenient, cities and municipal water authorities are spending big bucks to skim out the materials from their pipes and pumping stations. And that translates into higher bills for consumers.

Generally speaking, if it isn’t something you made yourself, and it isn’t toilet paper, you shouldn’t flush it down the toilet. Flushable wipes aren’t likely to clog your fixtures and pipes unless there are other things (like tree roots) that these no-no’s can get hung up on. But industry groups like the National Association of Clean Water Agencies are recommending that consumers treat items other than toilet paper as non-flushable and dispose of them in the trash rather than sending them into the municipal sewer.

If you are having trouble with your home’s sewer connection, or are experiencing sewage backups, Boston Standard Plumbing & Heating can help! Call us at (617) 288-2911 to clear blocked sewer lines anytime of the day or night. We offer 24-hour emergency service and we’re always around to lend a hand!

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A Few Interesting Facts About Boston Plumbing History

High quality plumbing is something we all take for granted, largely because our current plumbing codes provide modern sanitation solutions. Believe or not, fewer than 100 years ago, for our major cities – including Boston, plumbing and the need for superior sanitation were not entirely understood.

Boston has been at the forefront of plumbing innovations in the United States, and some of the city’s more notable residents have made exceptional contributions to the development of modern plumbing and sanitation. Here are a few interesting facts about “Boston plumbing” that you may not know.

First in Firefighting

Necessity is often the mother of invention, and by 1650, Boston needed a way to combat house fires! In 1652, the City of Boston installed water lines to deliver water for firefighting and domestic use to the inhabited portions of the city. Water lines were often made from hollowed-out trees, and the tree’s natural shape often determined where the waterlines went!

In the 1700’s, the City of Boston sold fresh water from the system to residents at street-level pumps. Wooden pipes were used for municipal water delivery until the early 1800’s, when the size of the system grew large enough to require pressurization. The wooden water infrastructure couldn’t hold up to the pressure, so iron pipes – first used in Philadelphia – were substituted.

Tremont House

The Tremont House was a hotel in Boston that operated between 1829 and 1895. It was located at the intersection of Tremont and Beacon Streets, and was the first American hotel to feature indoor plumbing, indoor toilets and baths and free soap for the guests. Isaiah Rogers, who later transferred his plumbing design innovations to the Astor House in New York City in 1836, designed the hotel’s plumbing.

Steam-powered pumps delivered fresh water to a holding tank on the hotel’s roof, which provided sufficient water pressure at each tap. The hotel’s toilets were located on the ground floor, and bathtubs (cold-water only) were located in the basement. Running water was also delivered to the hotel’s kitchen and laundry facilities, and wastewater was drained away from the hotel to a simple sewage system.

Isaiah Rogers wasn’t the only one with good ideas. For a time, Rogers employed a man named Samuel Willard, who is credited with developing the first commercial system of centralized heating in the US. (If Rogers and Willard had stayed together, they could have formed the first plumbing and heating company in Boston!)

Boston Outlaws Bathing!

What?! (It’s true!) In 1845, the City Council of Boston passed an ordinance that banned bathing in the winter except under doctor’s orders. Philadelphia first considered banning bathing in 1835, but the measure failed by a slim two votes.

Although it seems counterintuitive, cities were trying to cope with outbreaks of disease, and modern wastewater sanitation wasn’t yet in place. Tub bathing – which was something of a novelty – was implicated (fairly or not) in the spread of serious water-borne diseases. Germ theory hadn’t yet taken hold (and wouldn’t until after the Civil War), and tub bathing took the blame for the spread of disease. In all fairness, the city’s relatively few bathtubs were not outfitted with drains, the water wasn’t heated and used water had to be removed with buckets, which meant that it wasn’t changed very often. (Yuck!)

New York City passed the first modern sanitation laws in the late 1860’s and many American cities (including Boston) promptly followed suit.

The Rise of the Flush Toilet

The development of the modern flush toilet occurred as a series of innovations over about 50 years, beginning in the late 1850’s. Running water, siphon flushing and draining, traps and probably most importantly, the development of the sanitary sewer system, meant that residents no longer threw their waste into the streets. The introduction of the sewer system and other sanitation innovations reduced the spread of diseases in cities and paved the way for practical, sanitary indoor plumbing. As one of the major port cities, Boston was often at the forefront of these inventions, and served as a distribution point for “water closets” imported from England. The success of Boston’s municipal water projects led many other cities to incorporate water and sanitation facilities into their city plans.

We’re always here to help you out with problems that may arise with your plumbing. Boston Standard Plumbing & Heating provides professional plumbing services 24 hours a day. Call us at (617) 288-2911 anytime for help. Visit Boston Standard Plumbing on Facebook, too!

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DOE Stays Implementation of 80%-Efficient Furnace Phase-Out

The Department of Energy announced last week that it will temporarily hold off on enforcement of the agency’s phase-out plan for 80%-efficient furnaces in Massachusetts and 28 other states. The change in plan comes as the result of pending industry litigation that is not expected to be resolved prior to the proposed May 1, 2013 start date.

For Boston homeowners, that’s good news because it provides some additional time to consider the purchase and installation of 80%-efficient furnaces. We don’t know when enforcement of the new plan will begin, but the DOE is committed to phasing out 80%-efficient furnaces as soon as possible.

For the consumer, the option of having an 80%-efficient furnace often means saving money on the purchase and installation costs of a new furnace, and a reduction in operating costs if the 80%-efficient furnace replaces an older, even less efficient model. While it’s true that 90%-efficient furnaces cost less to operate than 80% efficient models do, they also come with a steeper price tag and more costly installation requirements. In some cases, the amount of time required to see real savings from a higher-efficiency furnace is actually longer than the payback period for the less efficient 80% model!

In addition, very high efficiency furnaces require special venting preparations that increase the cost of installation. These preparations include the need to install a chimney liner (if it’s going to be used for ventilation) or suitable ventilation ports for your high-efficiency furnace.

Because the furnace exhaust port carries heated air, CPVC (chlorinated polyvinyl chloride) is normally used for heated exhaust applications. When heated (even to a relatively low temperature), PVC piping can release toxins into the air and water through a phenomenon known as “PVC outgassing.” CPVC is manufactured differently, and is rated for use in applications where temperatures may reach 200°F. CPVC is somewhat more expensive than standard PVC, but both PVC and CPVC are substantially less expensive than metal piping made from stainless steel (for exhaust) or copper (for hot water).

The bottom line for homeowners in Boston: furnace replacement choices will become more limited very soon! Once the DOE regulations go into effect, it will be impossible to purchase or install a lower-cost, lower-efficiency furnace. Homeowners will need to absorb the increased purchase and installation costs associated with higher-efficiency furnaces and may find that their homes cannot provide the required ventilation for high-efficiency furnaces.

If you’re considering the installation of a new gas forced-air furnace, and would like to know more about your current options, contact us at Boston Standard Plumbing & Heating at (617) 288-2911 for a consultation. We can assess your home and provide you with a range of product and financing options.

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Video Sewer Line Inspections Can Reveal Trouble!

Few things strike fear in the hearts of homeowners faster than a problem with a home’s main drain. Boston sewer repairs can sneak up on a homeowner and wreak absolute havoc! Keeping your home’s sewer line clear is the best way to ensure that you don’t come home one evening to “Sewer Surprise!”

Your home’s sewer connection consists of some relatively large diameter pipe, most often made of clay, iron or plastic. Clay is commonly found in older homes, while plastic is used in newer construction and in replacement work.

Some homes built between 1945 and 1972 may have a sewer connection made of bituminous fiber, which is wood fiber and pitch that has been impregnated with asphalt. This product, called Orangeburg pipe, is no longer used in construction and is unsuitable for sanitary sewer connections. Orangeburg has a life expectancy of between 30-50 years, and deteriorates rapidly once material failure begins to occur.

Diagnosing a sewer line failure can be tricky without conducting a video inspection. The alternative to a video inspection is often excavation, so video examination is both cost-effective and highly accurate.

During a video inspection of a home’s sewer line, a special camera is introduced into the pipe. The camera shows the inside of the pipe and can detect cracks, joints and separations, tree root intrusions, partial or complete pipe collapses and defects in the sewer line that can cause debris to accumulate and restrict the flow of water to the city sewer line. Camera equipment traces exactly where breaks and defects have occurred, so the technology can precisely locate where excavation and repair work are needed. Further, most video camera inspection units have a locating beacon that helps an operator working outdoors to find the exact position of the camera while it is in the pipe.

Video inspection of a home’s sewer line can also be valuable for potential homeowners who are looking for a new home. By conducting a video inspection of a prospective purchase, would-be buyers can avoid any unpleasant surprises that might otherwise require thousands of dollars to repair. Alternately, the video inspection can provide a basis for negotiating a more favorable purchase price for a property.

Boston Standard Plumbing & Heating offers video inspection of sewer lines to determine the condition of the line and to detect faults, breaks and obstructions, as well as their locations. This kind of inspection can provide exceptional value to current homeowners, as well as prospective homeowners who are considering putting in an offer on a new home or investment property. Please give us a call at (617) 288-2911 to set up an appointment for this service.

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Proper Ventilation Extremely Important In Weather Extremes!

Ventilation, whether for plumbing fixtures or heating and cooling equipment, is vital to proper operation! Blocked plumbing vents can cause unpleasant odors to escape into the home, and can interfere with proper drainage. Blocked ventilation ducts for heating and cooling systems can cause a range of problems, including improper venting of noxious gases, improper fresh air intake, and decreased efficiency, which translates into higher operating costs.

Plumbing vents are connected to a home’s plumbing system and exit the home through the roof. These vents must be kept open to ensure that the plumbing system operates properly in a home. When the home’s plumbing vents are clear, gravity drains plumbing fixtures in a controlled fashion, leaving behind some water in each fixture’s trap. The residual water acts as a barrier between the top of the plumbing fixture (sink drain, bathtub drain, toilet bowl, etc) and the waste water pipe. This residual water prevents sewer gases from traveling “backwards” through the plumbing and escaping into the living space.

Organic debris from falling leaves and animal nests can cause a ventilation duct to become partially or completely blocked. In addition, prolonged below-freezing temperatures and increased snow accumulation can cause frost to build up on the plumbing vent.

The symptoms of blocked plumbing vents include the escape of unpleasant sewer gases into the home and drainage problems. When a plumbing vent is blocked, the drain empties completely or almost completely due to a phenomenon known as siphoning. When a drain siphons, the water drains with significant force, and the water that should remain in the trap is instead removed. Without the water in the trap, sewer gases can escape from the drain and foul the living space.

Usually a drain that is siphoning makes a significant amount of noise when water is present. Visually, you may also see a “whirlpool” created around the drain that allows the drain to admit both water and air into the drainpipe. In addition, an improperly vented drain will drain noticeably faster than one that is properly vented. Loud noises during drainage can indicate that a plumbing vent is blocked or partially blocked. The increased rate of drainage is due to the additional force that is pulling water through the drainpipe.

To correct a blocked ventilation pipe, manually inspect the vent and remove any debris that may have accumulated in the pipe. Do not cap or cover the vent stack, as they are required to remain open. If the vent is blocked due to frosting, you may not need to do anything special, as the first increase in temperature will melt the accumulated frost.

If your plumbing vent regularly frosts, you may want to modify the plumbing vent to widen out at the point of exit from the roof. Wider vent terminals tend to discourage complete frosting. Keep tree branches away from your roofline at all times to reduce the amount of organic debris that might accumulate otherwise.

If you have a blocked plumbing vent that you cannot clear on your own, contact us at Boston Standard Plumbing & Heating at (617) 288-2911 for assistance!

In my next post, I’ll discuss the importance of keeping ventilation pipes for heating and cooling equipment clear.

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High Efficiency Furnaces, Oil-to-Gas Conversions Can Cut Heating Costs

Last year’s mild winter may have been a blessing in disguise since it reduced the demand for heat significantly, but for homeowners in Boston, heating has come to the forefront this winter. Heating assistance programs in Boston are struggling to meet requests for help from families who simply can’t afford to heat their homes this winter.

According to the United Way, last year in Boston, heating assistance factored into about two-thirds of the agency’s 3,100 requests for help from area families. The agency budgeted about $750,000 for heating assistance (during last year’s unseasonably mild winter) and still saw unmet assistance requests of nearly $500,000. This year, federal fuel subsidies have been cut, leaving many states and private agencies to fill in the gaps. Those programs are running low on fuel assistance dollars largely because of the high cost of heating oil in Massachusetts. The current average price for heating oil in Boston is about $3.81 per gallon, while some suppliers have broken the $4.00/gallon mark.

When meeting basic necessities is a major priority, most homeowners don’t contemplate major home improvements like heating and cooling system replacements. For homeowners who are in a position to do so, upgrading to high-efficiency heating equipment or converting from oil to natural gas heat right now can pay dividends down the road. Reducing heating costs and fuel consumption now may help cushion the blow of an unexpected job loss or loss of income in the future.

In 2013, homeowners can take advantage of some exceptional rebates, tax credits and 0% financing programs that can help reduce the cost of upgrading or converting to natural gas. In some cases – particularly with oil-to-gas conversions – homeowners can start to reap the return on investment right away.

Natural gas is plentiful, and can slash winter heating bills by half or more during an average winter. Moving to a natural gas furnace or boiler makes a lot of sense for homeowners who are still working, but who are either contemplating retirement or approaching retirement age. By making major upgrades now, these homeowners can help ensure cost-control for winter heat once they’ve transitioned out of the workforce and into retirement – when their household income may be both reduced and fixed.

Natural gas conversion or upgrades may also make a home more attractive to prospective buyers, and may reduce the amount of time it takes to sell the home. A recent Massachusetts real estate survey, which we discussed recently on this blog, shows that the majority of prospective buyers strongly prefer a home that is heated with natural gas.

There’s no reason to continue using low-efficiency heating equipment or spending thousands of dollars more than necessary on old, expensive-to-operate and potentially hazardous heating equipment. If you are considering an upgrade to your low-efficiency (less than 80%) heating equipment, or an oil-to-gas conversion, please contact us at Boston Standard Plumbing & Heating at (617) 288-2911. We’ll set up an appointment to inspect your current heating equipment and let you know about programs that are designed to help reduce the cost of upgrading to less-costly and more environmentally friendly heating options.

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Natural Gas Heats Up Real Estate Market in Massachusetts

Based on a new survey of realtors in Massachusetts, natural gas heat wins over prospective home buyers. According to the survey, more than half of prospective home buyers strongly prefer properties with natural gas heat over those that use heating oil.

Respondents said that only 3% of buyers would insist upon natural gas heat as a condition of the sale, but buyers’ strong preference for natural gas heat shows that heating costs may be a partial driver in the decision to make an offer, and may also help sellers get better prices for their properties.

Interestingly, the survey also showed that 70% of sellers said they would not provide any buyer incentives or accept price reductions for homes that were heated with heating oil. That refusal could translate into longer listing periods for those homes, which could, in turn, trigger price reductions in a home’s asking price that exceed the cost of converting from oil to natural gas.

The cost of heating a home with natural gas is currently significantly lower than the cost of heating with oil. Current per-gallon prices for heating oil in the Boston area are averaging between $3.65 and $3.70 per gallon. Average heating oil prices in central Massachusetts are slightly higher.

Homeowners can expect to use about 800-1,000 gallons per heating season to heat an average sized home, assuming average winter temperatures. Typically, oil burners are somewhere between 50% and 80% efficient. Lower-efficiency heaters will require more heating oil. At $3.65 per gallon, the homeowner who uses heating oil can expect to spend between $2,900 and $3,650 to heat the average home this winter.

By comparison, converting to natural gas heat can save more than $1,000 in operational costs alone in a single heating season, and homeowners can also take advantage of rebates available through the utility companies to lower the cost of installation. In addition, some federal tax breaks for installing high-efficiency home heating products have recently been extended. Taking advantage of these tax breaks can also lower the cost of converting to natural gas.

For the home seller, the switch to natural gas is an obvious selling point. Buyers have expressed a strong preference for heating with natural gas, so a home that’s already been converted may sell faster and command a better price. In contrast, buyers may balk at paying the asking price for a home that uses oil heat, especially if they plan to convert the heating equipment to natural gas after the sale.

Taking into account the reduced cost of operating a high-efficiency gas heater along with rebates and tax breaks, the conversion could pay for itself in as little as a single season, and that doesn’t even take into account any pricing premiums the seller may be able to get.

If you’re thinking about selling your Boston home, oil-to-gas conversion may be one way to set your home apart from other properties on the market. For more information about oil to gas conversion, or to learn about rebates and tax breaks that you may be able to take advantage of, contact Boston Standard Plumbing & Heating at (617) 288-2911. We’ll be happy to consult with you and provide an estimate of how much a conversion will cost, and what you can save by making the switch now!

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Boston Standard Plumbing Receives 2012 Angie's List Super Service Award

We’re pleased to announce that for the third year in a row, Boston Standard Plumbing & Heating has received the Angie’s List Super Service Award. The award recognizes the top five percent of all companies rated on Angie’s List during the year. Angie’s List is a member-based organization that provides consumer reviews on a wide variety of local service providers.

The awards, which were announced in late December, are given to service providers based on the number of member reviews they’ve received, the ratings given by list members, and the recipients’ ability to follow Angie’s List operational guidelines.

We’re very proud of the service we deliver at Boston Standard Plumbing & Heating, and we’d like to thank our customers for their continued support. We work hard to provide the best quality heating, cooling and plumbing products, and the outstanding service that our customers have come to know and expect.

We offer true 24-hour end-to-end emergency response services. What we mean is that when you call us – no matter what time of the day or night – the first person you talk to is a trained, certified, licensed and insured plumbing, heating and cooling professional. We don’t turn our phones over to an answering service, so we can respond immediately to your plumbing, heating and cooling emergencies.

Our fully stocked trucks are ready to roll around the clock. We keep a wide range of the most commonly needed parts in stock, so you won’t have to wait on parts to get your repair work completed. We have the staff to handle both large and small repairs, and we provide “bottom-line” quotes before we start work, so you won’t be left wondering about labor costs and time estimates.

Plumbing, heating and cooling repairs are rarely convenient and can be messy! We also take care while we work in your home, and won’t leave a mess behind. We cover your floors and items in the work area to protect them from dust, dirt and debris. We also use shoe-covers to avoid tracking dirt and debris from the work area through your home.

We offer a wide variety of the highest quality heating and cooling products, and provide certified installation services that can help you save money while keeping your home comfortable and safe. We are fully licensed and insured, so you can be confident that you’ll get the expertise you need to safely correct heating, cooling or plumbing problems in your home.

Count on Boston Standard Plumbing & Heating when you’re contemplating major system revisions, like oil-to-gas conversions, tankless water heater installations, boiler service, and central air conditioning installations or replacements. We can also provide you with a wide variety of money-saving options when your circumstances require something different. We can also help you take advantage of rebates and tax credits that are currently available for high-efficiency heating, cooling and domestic hot water systems.

When it comes to comfort and safety in your home, count on Boston Standard Plumbing & Heating, winner of the Angie’s List Super Service Award for three consecutive years! Contact us at (617) 288-2911 anytime for your plumbing, heating and cooling needs!

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